Ahimsa, Veganism, and Yoga Sutra II:35

Ahimsa pratisthayam tat saminidhau vaira tyagah.
In the presence of one established in non-violence, all hostility ceases.
Yoga Sutra II:35

Nonviolence (or non-harming, as ahimsa is sometimes translated) became an important ideal for me when I got sober in 2009. I didn’t want to be the “tornado ripping through other people’s lives” anymore. For the first time, I began to consider the effects of my actions on others, and realized how harmful I could be, even unintentionally.

I had been vegetarian for some time but decided that I needed to become vegan to match my behavior to my ideals. Veganism is a major part of my ahimsa practice. It means much more than not eating dairy or meat.

Continue reading “Ahimsa, Veganism, and Yoga Sutra II:35” »

The Funky Jiva

In a few days, I’ll be attending my first non-Ashtanga workshop ever. Gasp.

Giselle Mari, the Funky Jiva, is coming to Indianapolis for a weekend, and I’ll be taking classes with her like “Break through without Breaking: Backbends” and “Fire in the Soul: Twists.” I’m sure it will be a good time.

Don’t worry, I’m not abandoning my dedication to Guruji’s practice. This is just a fun little side trip on my Ashtanga path. A few weeks ago, CITYOGA asked me to interview Giselle Mari prior to her workshop there this weekend, and they gave me full access to her workshops. Who am I to turn down a free class or two?

Continue reading “The Funky Jiva” »

A yogic diet: not something to rush into.

The stereotype of the vegan, sprouts-eating yogi is there for a reason.


Lentil stew: a yogi’s winter staple.

The most well-known of the yamas, or moral codes, of yoga, is ahimsa, which can be translated as non-violence or non-harm.  Someone who practices ahimsa tries to live in a way that causes the least amount of harm possible.  Continue reading “A yogic diet: not something to rush into.” »